wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

Description

Product Description

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize
Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize


On a desert island in the heart of the Galapagos archipelago, where Darwin received his first inklings of the theory of evolution, two scientists, Peter and Rosemary Grant, have spent twenty years proving that Darwin did not know the strength of his own theory. For among the finches of Daphne Major, natural selection is neither rare nor slow: it is taking place by the hour, and we can watch.

In this dramatic story of groundbreaking scientific research, Jonathan Weiner follows these scientists as they watch Darwin''s finches and come up with a new understanding of life itself. The Beak of the Finch is an elegantly written and compelling masterpiece of theory and explication in the tradition of Stephen Jay Gould.

With a new preface.

Amazon.com Review

Rosemary and Peter Grant and those assisting them have spend twenty years on Daphne Major, an island in the Galapagos studying natural selection. They recognize each individual bird on the island, when there are four hundred at the time of the author''s visit, or when there are over a thousand. They have observed about twenty generations of finches -- continuously.
Jonathan Weiner follows these scientists as they watch Darwin''s finches and come up with a new understanding of life itself.

From Publishers Weekly

Weiner follows scientists Peter and Rosemary Grant who, for the past 20 years, have studied the continuing evolution of the beaks of finches in the Galapagos Islands.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

The Beak of the Finch is brilliant . . . one of those rare books that permanently alters one’s view of nature and even of life and death.”
—Richard Preston, author of The Hot Zone
 
“Evolution in the flesh, a landmark in evolutionary studies.”
Los Angeles Times
 
“Evocative writing, exhaustive research, and Weiner’s memorable portrait of the engaging Grants assure The Beak of the Finch membership in the select pantheon of science books that spark not just the intellect, but the imagination.”
Washington Post Book World
 
“Admirable and much-needed . . . superb at explaining very complex scientific and philosophical concepts in lucid prose. . . . Weiner’s triumph is to reveal how evolution and science work, and to let them speak clearly for themselves.”
The New York Times Book Review
 
“A sparkling exploration of the single most powerful and compelling force in nature.”
Philadelphia Inquirer
 
“This is science writing at its most accomplished: both an account of how science is done and an eloquent illustration of why we do it.”
Globe and Mail (Toronto)
 
“Wise and intelligent . . . Weiner’s engrossing book shows just how profoundly Darwin underestimated the power of his own ideas.”
The Sciences
 
“It has every chance of becoming a classic.”
The Times (of London)
 
“This is an exceptional book, artfully crafted, lucid and richly descriptive. It is the best exploration of evolution written in recent years. It conveys a powerful insight into life that helps us to understand the fundamental forces of nature and our relationship to the world about us. Highly recommended.”
Cleveland Plain Dealer
 
“First class . . . one of the best pieces of science writing that I have read in a long while.”
Nature
 
“Spectacular, page-turning . . . the ideal book to recommend to any doubter who asks, ‘where’s the evidence for evolution.’”
Sunday Times (London)
 
“Jonathan Weiner is a science writer who makes complex research accessible to the ordinary person, and he does so with wit and style. . . . Reads like a combination detective story and adventure book.”
Dallas Morning News
 
“Leads us deeper and deeper into what Darwin called ‘the mystery of mysteries’. . . . Weiner picks up the pieces of this puzzle and holds them up to the light at just the right angle. . . . He leaves us with not only a greater understanding of the forces of nature but also a greater sense of wonder at creation.”
Chicago Tribune
 
“Lyrical . . . as intimate, precise and meticulous as his subject’s groundbreaking work, and deserves to have the same wide influence.”
The Economist
 
“An invaluable living lesson in evolutionary change.”
San Diego Union
 
“This remarkable book will forever change your sense of the pace of nature—once you’ve read Weiner s elegant and absorbing account, the world will seem infinitely more fluid, shifting, alive.”
—Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature
 
“Well-written, fascinating . . . this classic of science writing deserves to be as widely read as any Tom Clancy thriller.”
Roanoke Times & World-News
 
“Combines vivid and witty on-the-scene reporting with a sound and evocative explication of Charles Darwin’s place in the history of ideas. Succinct and highly readable, The Beak of the Finch is science writing of a high order.”
—Timothy Ferris, author of Coming of Age in the Milky Way
 
“Darwin’s finches make for a scientific thriller . . . in The Beak of the Finch, Jonathan Weiner took me on an astonishing voyage of discovery that, in many ways, is a sequel to the most famous scientific voyage in history.”
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
 
“[An] engaging narrative of a modern scientific study that will forever change the way that we view evolution. . . . This is a rare book: The Beak of the Finch is at once absorbing science history, deftly crafted popular science treatise and engagingly personal narrative. . . . It has an important story to tell, not only of Darwin’s finches and evolution but also of the way that forefront scientific research is carried out.”
The Los Angeles Times Book Review
 
“This book is an extraordinary achievement. It is carefully researched, impeccably crafted, unflinchingly dramatic, yet conscientiously scientific.”
School Library Journal

From the Publisher

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

From the Inside Flap

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

On a desert island in the heart of the Galapagos archipelago, where Darwin received his first inklings of the theory of evolution, two scientists, Peter and Rosemary Grant, have spent twenty years proving that Darwin did not know the strength of his own theory.  For among the finches of Daphne Major, natural selection is neither rare nor slow: it is taking place by the hour, and we can watch.

In this dramatic story of groundbreaking scientific research, Jonathan Weiner follows these scientists as they watch Darwin''s finches and come up with a new understanding of life itself.   The Beak of the Finch is an elegantly written and compelling masterpiece of theory and explication in the tradition of Stephen Jay Gould.

From the Back Cover

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize
On a desert island in the heart of the Galapagos archipelago, where Darwin received his first inklings of the theory of evolution, two scientists, Peter and Rosemary Grant, have spent twenty years proving that Darwin did not know the strength of his own theory. For among the finches of Daphne Major, natural selection is neither rare nor slow: it is taking place by the hour, and we can watch.
In this dramatic story of groundbreaking scientific research, Jonathan Weiner follows these scientists as they watch Darwin''s finches and come up with a new understanding of life itself. The Beak of the Finch is an elegantly written and compelling masterpiece of theory and explication in the tradition of Stephen Jay Gould.

About the Author

Jonathan Weiner is one of the most distinguished popular-science writers in the country: his books have won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Slate, Time, The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The New Republic, Scientific American, Smithsonian, and many other newspapers and magazines, and he is a former editor at The Sciences. He is the author of The Beak of the Finch; Time, Love, Memory; Long for This World; His Brother''s Keeper; The Next One Hundred Years; and Planet Earth. He lives in New York, where he teaches science writing at Columbia University''s Graduate School of Journalism.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
422 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

SmallsTop Contributor: Makeup
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very repetitive and all over the place.
Reviewed in the United States on December 11, 2018
I was not a fan. It''s easy enough to read, but it does take a bit of effort to fully engage in it. The book jumps from many perspectives, the author''s view, Darwin''s, other scientists, then just sort of random tidbits. The "layout" of the story could have been kept... See more
I was not a fan. It''s easy enough to read, but it does take a bit of effort to fully engage in it. The book jumps from many perspectives, the author''s view, Darwin''s, other scientists, then just sort of random tidbits. The "layout" of the story could have been kept neater. It''s highly repetitive... But what got me the most was some of the overly "descriptive" lines that often weren''t necessary. For example, I can''t get over the line, "small beaks are small, medium beaks are medium." There was another part talking about either a desert or a season (I can''t remember), but it said something about the subject like, "the dry (something) was very dry." Okay...

Anyway, if you''re looking to read about Darwin and his finches, this is definitely a good book for that. However, I just think it could have been slimmed down and proof-read more.
9 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Patricia Morris
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fabulous Book
Reviewed in the United States on January 18, 2019
How could a book about finch beaks be fascinating you wonder? Well at least to a biologist it is. A spectacular documentation of natural selection in action in real time. My partner and I took this book on a vacation to a beautiful beach in Honduras. Now we did manage... See more
How could a book about finch beaks be fascinating you wonder? Well at least to a biologist it is. A spectacular documentation of natural selection in action in real time. My partner and I took this book on a vacation to a beautiful beach in Honduras. Now we did manage to fit in snorkeling, diving and diving with dolphins, but in between we just waited around for the other one to put it down for a moment so we could snag it for a chapter or two. "You want to go get some lunch?" "Nah, I''m not really hungry, you go, but please leave the book here."
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Otter
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"Speciation Has never been observed..."
Reviewed in the United States on December 5, 2015
A great introduction to legendary field-work. It isn''t a critical analysis: it''s a hymn of sorts to some admirable scientists spanning a century and a half. But it sees even in their flaws (e.g., Darwin''s slow-dawning comprehension on the significance of his finches) a... See more
A great introduction to legendary field-work. It isn''t a critical analysis: it''s a hymn of sorts to some admirable scientists spanning a century and a half. But it sees even in their flaws (e.g., Darwin''s slow-dawning comprehension on the significance of his finches) a model for how science can and should work.

By coincidence I was reading this around the time I found myself in a conversation with a creationist who claimed there had never been an observable case of speciation. (I dunno, don''t ask me.). While I didn''t engage, because such conversations are usually non-starters, it was rather nice to have a terrific real-world compendium of Darwin''s evolving thought as it''s reflected in the field work.

The book wants constant updating, though. Many tantalizing hints are dropped that are not developed but which might be, given the advances in published research.
9 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
C. Macauley
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Evolution, Up Close & Personal
Reviewed in the United States on September 24, 2009
The story of Rosemary and Peter Grant''s twenty-year study of the finches of the Galapagos islands goes far beyond ornithology and even beyond biology: the author contends that the Grants have successfully observed the birds evolving under stressful conditions to become... See more
The story of Rosemary and Peter Grant''s twenty-year study of the finches of the Galapagos islands goes far beyond ornithology and even beyond biology: the author contends that the Grants have successfully observed the birds evolving under stressful conditions to become better adapted to their environment. That claim may be disputed, but the book is a great adventure story of science under brutal conditions--the most barren of islands, so rugged that just landing on it is potentially fatal. The description of how the study was conceived and carried out is woven into the Grants'' own personal story and the whole is placed into the context of the history of evolutionary theory, told in an intelligent and entertaining style. The book ends with some comparisons of other similar attempts to observe evolution, and the arguments are compelling that the Grants have succeeded in doing so.

While fascinating and well-written, I must admit that there were parts that were a bit dry and you really have to love this subject to get all the way through the book. Probably the best part is Weiner''s explanation for why the finches'' beaks are so crucial to their survival: their primary food source is a tiny, rock-hard seed. There is also a very funny passage on how the Grants discovered what male finches find sexually attractive.

A pleasant and engrossing read for the serious or semi-serious naturalist. Recommended for those who enjoyed Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World .
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
eun.shim
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Love the book. Deserves the prize.
Reviewed in the United States on November 26, 2018
This is a beautifully written documentary. I learned so much about the Galápagos Islands, Charles Darwin, and how past and contemporary researchers put pieces together to produce empirical evidence of adaptation and evolution. The effort involve ingenious ideas and... See more
This is a beautifully written documentary. I learned so much about the Galápagos Islands, Charles Darwin, and how past and contemporary researchers put pieces together to produce empirical evidence of adaptation and evolution. The effort involve ingenious ideas and painstaking labors to test the ideas, which is interesting in and out of itself. It was even more of a pleasure to read about them in such a beautiful writing. Now I know what kind of books receive Pulitzer award. I first borrowed the book from the library but decided to buy to read it multiple times.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
T. Wasow
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
but I thought the narrative did not maintain as coherent a story line as in the best popular science writing
Reviewed in the United States on November 22, 2016
I read this while on a cruise in the Galapagos, which made it more interesting to me than if I had been somewhere else. The story of the Grants'' research on the "Darwin finches" is fascinating, but I thought the narrative did not maintain as coherent a story line... See more
I read this while on a cruise in the Galapagos, which made it more interesting to me than if I had been somewhere else. The story of the Grants'' research on the "Darwin finches" is fascinating, but I thought the narrative did not maintain as coherent a story line as in the best popular science writing. I thought the reflections on larger issues (e.g. science vs. religious dogma, the causes and effects of climate change, and the rapid evolution of bacteria and viruses in reaction to modern medicines) at the end of the book were well done and among the best sections.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
S. Carlson
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Explication of Darwin’s Theory
Reviewed in the United States on January 12, 2019
The author does fine work describing Darwin’s theory and telling the story of the Grant’s lifelong work in the Galapagos. Particularly engaging were the final few chapters exploring humanity’s various, and generally vain, attempts to “control” nature.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Alexander R
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Captures the mindset of Darwin by placing him along contemporary biologists.
Reviewed in the United States on January 8, 2015
What a fantastic book. Weiner is an amazing writer and this book shifts from biography, to novel, to historical nonfiction smoothly while capturing the mindset of Darwin by placing him along contemporary biologists. I''m not a biologist and have never had a formal... See more
What a fantastic book. Weiner is an amazing writer and this book shifts from biography, to novel, to historical nonfiction smoothly while capturing the mindset of Darwin by placing him along contemporary biologists. I''m not a biologist and have never had a formal introduction to evolution, but I feel this book has certainly prepped me for that!
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Gary
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good book but terrible quality print.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 3, 2020
The book is excellent but *my* book is terrible. The cover quality is terrible with artifacts that suggest it was scanned in some way and reprinted. The text is readable but smudged in a few places. The images are awful. If this isn''t a counterfeit then the original...See more
The book is excellent but *my* book is terrible. The cover quality is terrible with artifacts that suggest it was scanned in some way and reprinted. The text is readable but smudged in a few places. The images are awful. If this isn''t a counterfeit then the original publisher should be ashamed. Sadly I suspect it is a counterfeit.
Report
Vicki M
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 4, 2018
Fanatastic
Report
Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Four Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 14, 2016
Great book for those interested in natural sciences.
Report
Holly Duffy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 9, 2013
This is one of the best books I''ve ever read, and I''m not usually a fan of non-fiction. It tells the stories of both Darwin discovering natural selection and the Grants showing natural selection in action, and the parallel is done very well. It is very easy to read and no...See more
This is one of the best books I''ve ever read, and I''m not usually a fan of non-fiction. It tells the stories of both Darwin discovering natural selection and the Grants showing natural selection in action, and the parallel is done very well. It is very easy to read and no prior knowledge is needed to follow the story.
Report
Miguel Palma
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
As described
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 8, 2017
As described
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

More items to explore

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • academic research
  • galapagos islands
  • animal genetics
  • pittsburgh history
  • print of dna
  • gifts for nature lovers

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale

wholesale The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution lowest in discount Our Time outlet sale